Sunday, April 21, 2013

1960 Topps Managers, Eddie Sawyer and Paul Richards

A few more from this cool subset of 1960 managers. 

The scholarly Eddie Sawyer held a Masters degree from Cornell, was a college instructor and played minor league ball in the Yankee organization. He served as a player/manager until his friend Herb Pennock brought him into the Phillies chain in 1944 and made him manager of the Phils in 1948.

He managed the team to the NL pennant in 1950 in a hard fought race against the Dodgers. That was easily his most successful year as a manager. He was replaced in 1952 and remained out of baseball until he was hired back in 1958 for a second term as Phils manager. He managed through the 1959 season and then resigned one game into the '60 campaign. 

Would that be an Awesome Night card? We'll have to ask Night Owl

Paul Richards managed the Orioles from 1955 to 1961. Before that he was a catcher with the Dodgers (1932), Giants (1933–35), Philadelphia A's (1935) and Detroit Tigers (1943–46). He managed the White Sox before and after he was at the helm in Baltimore. He also served as the General Manager for the Orioles, the Houston Colt .45s and the Atlanta Braves.

In Baltimore he was credited with developing many of the players that brought the Birds out of obscurity to a second place finish in 1960 including Brooks Robinson and several pitchers including Steve Barber, Milt Pappas and Jack Fisher who made up their young staff.

He also developed the over-sized catchers mitt that Gus Triandos and others used to handle Hoyt Wilhelm's knuckler. Although the Texan never won a pennant he managed 16 players who went on the manage in the big leagues.

His card provides the rare look at Baltimore's Memorial Stadium on a card from this era. My favorite stadium of all. 


  1. Too difficult to tell whether it's an ANC.

    It could be an Awesome Blue Wall.

  2. Nice blog. Just added you to my favorites.

    1. Thanks. Love your look at small ball fields. There is something very special about a quiet, empty ballpark. It makes your imagination work. Doubleday Field in Cooperstown is like that.